keeponmovingalong

Send me a couple numbers to find out:

  • Have you ever:
  • 1. Skipped class?
  • 2. Done drugs?
  • 3. Self harmed?
  • 4. Drank?
  • 5. Shoplifted?
  • 6. Gotten a tattoo?
  • 7. Broken up with someone?
  • What's your favorite:
  • 8. Show?
  • 9. Movie?
  • 10. Song?
  • 11. Tumblr?
  • 12. Singer/Band?
  • 13. Memory?
  • 14. Book?
  • This or that:
  • 15. Invisibility or Ability to fly?
  • 16. Cookies or Cake?
  • 17. Twitter or Facebook?
  • 18. Movies or Books?
  • 19. Coke or Sprite?
  • 20. Blind or Deaf?
  • 21. Tea or Coffee?
  • What's your:
  • 22. Age?
  • 23. Sign?
  • 24. Height?
  • 25. Sexual orientation?
  • 26. Shoe size?
  • 27. Religion?
  • 28. Longest relationship?
  • Opinion on:
  • 29. Gay rights?
  • 30. Second chances?
  • 31. Long distance relationships?
  • 32. Abortion?
  • 33. The death penalty?
  • 34. Marijuana ?
  • 35. Love?
  • Do you:
  • 36. Believe in ghost?
  • 37. Shower facing the shower head or turned away from it?
  • 38. Sleep with the door opened or closed?
  • 39. Love someone?
  • 40. Still watch cartoons?
  • 41. Have a boyfriend/girlfriend?
  • 42. Like yourself?
chicagogeek
chicagogeek:

Sophia C. Gudehus (1897-1903)Forest Home CemeteryForest Park, IL
A victim of the famous Iroquois Theatre Disaster, an event on December 30, 1903 that killed 605 people. It is the deadliest single-building fire in U.S. history. The building’s exterior remained intact and reopened as the Colonial, until it was torn down for the present day Oriental Theatre in 1926. It’s said that folks using the alley as a short-cut at night often hear moans and feel their pants and skirts being tugged. During shows at the Oriental, actors on stage see lots of people in period clothes watching from the wings who suddenly disappear.

chicagogeek:

Sophia C. Gudehus (1897-1903)
Forest Home Cemetery
Forest Park, IL

A victim of the famous Iroquois Theatre Disaster, an event on December 30, 1903 that killed 605 people. It is the deadliest single-building fire in U.S. history. The building’s exterior remained intact and reopened as the Colonial, until it was torn down for the present day Oriental Theatre in 1926. It’s said that folks using the alley as a short-cut at night often hear moans and feel their pants and skirts being tugged. During shows at the Oriental, actors on stage see lots of people in period clothes watching from the wings who suddenly disappear.